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[Video] Six 13 – The Thanksgivukkah Anthem – Jewish Music ReportKol Isha

Don’t ever underestimate the appeal of an event that isn’t going to happen for another 79000+ years. You had to know Six 13 was going to take this one on, 
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Battle of the Thanksgivukkah balladsNew York Daily News

First on the Thanksgivukkah music scene was Rabbi David Paskin, co-head of the Kehillah Schechter Academy. As the closest Jewish Day center to the 
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Classicalite’s 8 Best: Musical Works for ChanukahClassicalite

Expecting a Classicalite’s Five Best? It’s Chanukah! And even though there’s a shocking paucity of decent music for this particular Jewishfestival, 8 is indeed the 
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J Jam Music! The Best Chanukah Show Since the Oil Lasted 8 Days!Arutz Sheva

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Sunrise temple features musical ShabbatsSun-Sentinel

The service, titled “Feelin’ Groovy Shabbat,” was part of the musical “Thank G-d It’s Shabbat” service, which the Sunrise Jewish Center holds on the first Friday of 
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Comedian Rachel Bloom’s Chanukah Version of ‘Santa Baby Music Times

Comedian and writer, Rachel Bloom, has released another one of her comedic music videos. This time it’s a song from her Chanukah and Jewish themed album 
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Rescuer of Humanity Awards event Dec. 10Cleveland Jewish News

Project Love will host its 19th annual Rescuer of Humanity Awards Dinner at 6:15 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10 at Executive Caterers at Landerhaven, 6111 
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Jspace News Relaunches With Multi-Faceted New SiteDigitalJournal.com

 and articles organized by categories like Current Events, Business, Judaism and  Bridging the gap between Jewish-American and Diaspora readers and 
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Israeli Consulate to Host Event Strengthening Israel-India RelationshipShalom Life

Israeli Consulate to Host Event Strengthening Israel-India Relationship the Rajasthan Association of North America and the Jewish community’s Centre for 
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Holiday eventsCleveland Jewish News

Family Chanukah potluck dinner, 6-6:45 p.m., Temple Beth Shalom, 50 Division St., Hudson. Followed by Chanukah service. 330-656-1800 or 
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Books are big at the JCCsSun-Sentinel

The Mandel Jewish Community Centers in Palm Beach Gardens and Raton both hosted recent successful book and author events that prove the printed word 
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MK Calderon Comments on Chilul Hashem & Bitul TorahY.W. Editor

It drives me crazy and it is an embarrassment to talmidei chachamim and it is bitul Torah. I am calling on you to either bring a sefer with you or return to beis 
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Video: Rabbi Benny’s Holiday Torah Thought | CrownHeights.info zalman

Video: Rabbi Benny’s Holiday Torah Thought. benny chanukah. Rabbi Benny Hershcovich, Shliach in Cabo, Mexico, delivers his brief and hilarious thoughts on 
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Congressman Ted and Jill Deutch to be honoredSun-Sentinel

“Ted works as a Congressman with a framework that includes the values that define his life,” said Rabbi David Steinhardt of B’nai Torah Congregation, the 
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Judaica on view during Hanukkah at Metropolitan MuseumeTurboNews

The first appears in a copy of the Mishneh Torah of Maimonides that is on loan from The Jewish Theological Seminary Library (Gallery 304). The Mishneh Torah 
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Lunch and Learn with Rabbi Yisroel JungreisNY Blueprint

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Temple Beth Torah hosts special ‘Post Hanukkah’ celebrationYour Houston News

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Torah lishma: Study group marks 50 yearsNew Jersey Jewish News

It was an unusual day for the Bible study group at the Millburn home of Renee and Kopel Burke. Rusty Pusin, whose parents were among the group’s founders, 
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Remaining true to our rootsSun-Sentinel

When Yosef (Joseph) is appointed second to the king by Pharaoh he is given an Egyptian name. In the words of the Torah; “and Pharaoh called Yosef — Tzafnat 
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MK Dr. Ruth Calderon: The Knesset’s Guardian against Bittul TorahJewschool

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Becoming a parent: Parashat Miketz (Genesis 41:1-44:17)The Jewish Journal of Greater L.A.

His father, Jacob, was a poor role model; Torah speaks frankly about Jacob’s  to teach the childTorah, to find the child a spouse [others add: a partner], and to 
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Week of November 25th: Jewish Life in the 京 | KehillatJake

Week of November 25th: Jewish Life in the 京. Click Here for the latest schedule and events for Jewish events in Beijing! ← Previous Post. Jewish Sports!
Kehillat
Israel changes livesSun-Sentinel

Alan Goch, editor of the Jewish Journal, recently returned to South Florida following a mission to Israel with the Jewish Federation of Broward County. He shares 
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Menorah To Light Up Westport For HanukkahThe Daily Voice

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Funny, you don’t look PewishNew Jersey Jewish News

Last month, the Pew Research Center’s Religion and Public Life Project released “A Portrait ofJewish Americans,” the first major study of the American-Jewish 
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Hanukkah decor has yet to find its creative groove: Style CzarToronto Star

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Let’s Drink A L’Chaim To Conservative JudaismThe Jewish Week

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Mumbai Jewish community marks 5 years since terror attack CBS News

MUMBAI – Members of the Jewish community in India’s largest city remembered the lives lost on the 5th anniversary of the Mumbai attacks Tuesday, holding a 
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Stop worrying – life is good for Jews in BritainJewish Chronicle

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Museum in Antwerp Recalls the Ships That Brought Einstein and Tablet Magazine

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Early Hanukkah: Freshman nets free tuition with halfcourt heaveJewish Post

 by the Schneeweis family’s Denver synagogue, Hebrew Educational Alliance,  Being together for the two holidays “is what’s really important in life,” their 
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A Basket Of Treats — And MemoriesThe Jewish Week

This is the first year that the organization, which sends checks to thousands of recipients every year before major Jewish holidays, started distributing the holiday 
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A Mash-up Of The HolidaysThe Jewish Week

Brandon Zelman, who is Jewish, is hosting the third show, “A Blue Christmas Without Jew,” on Dec. 17. Zelman, who is currently working on a play about the 
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Chabad.org
Your Chanukah Guide – 2013
Editor’s Note

Chanukah begins this year on Wednesday evening, November 27, 2013, and continues through Thursday, December 5, 2013. What follows is a how-to guide to the basics of Chanukah observance.

The Chabad.org staff wishes you and yours a Happy Chanukah!

Chanukah in a Nutshell

 

Chanukah — the eight-day festival of light that begins on the eve of the 25th of the Jewish month of Kislev — celebrates the triumph oflight over darkness, of purity overadulteration, of spirituality over materiality.

More than twenty-one centuries ago, the Holy Land was ruled by the Seleucids (Syrian-Greeks), who sought to forcefully Hellenize the people of Israel. Against all odds, a small band of faithful Jews defeated one of the mightiest armies on earth, drove the Greeks from the land, reclaimed the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and rededicated it to the service of G-d.

When they sought to light the Temple’s menorah (the seven branched candelabrum), they found only a single cruse of olive oil that had escaped contamination by the Greeks; miraculously, the one-day supply burned for eight days, until new oil could be prepared under conditions of ritual purity.

To commemorate and publicize these miracles, the sages instituted the festival of Chanukah. At the heart of the festival is the nightly menorah (candelabrum) lighting: a single flame on the first night, two on the second evening, and so on till the eighth night of Chanukah, when all eight lights are kindled.

On Chanukah we also add the Hallel and Al HaNissim in our daily prayers to offer praise and thanksgiving to G-d for “delivering the strong into the hands of theweak, the many into the hands of the few… the wicked into the hands of therighteous.”

Chanukah customs include eating foods fried in oil — latkes (potato pancakes) and sufganiot (doughnuts); playing with the dreidel (a spinning top on which are inscribed the Hebrew letters nungimmelhei and shin, an acronym for Nes Gadol Hayah Sham, “a great miracle happened there”); and the giving ofChanukah gelt, gifts of money, to children.

Click here for the complete story of Chanukah, and here for a comprehensive “How To” guide for the observances and customs of Chanukah.

The Menorah

The basic elements of a kosher menorah are eight holders for oil or candles and an additional holder, set apart from the rest, for theshamash (“attendant”) candle.

The Chanukah lights can either be candle flames or oil-fueled. Since the miracle of Chanukah happened with olive oil – the little cruse of oil that lasted for eight days – an oil menorah is preferable to a candle one, and olive oil is the ideal fuel. Cotton wicks are preferred because of the smooth flame they produce.

Whenever purchasing a mitzvah article, we try to buy the most beautiful one that is within our means. So, if at all possible, go for the silver menorah. Beautifying a mitzvah is our way of expressing our appreciation to G‑d, and showing how dearly we hold His commandments.

The eight candles of the menorah must be arranged in a straight, even line, not in a zigzag or with some lights higher than others. If it is an oil menorah, the oil cups must hold enough oil to burn for the required time – at least 30 minutes on weeknights, and up to one-and-a-half hours on Friday evening (see Special Shabbat Rules). If it is a candle menorah, the candles should be large enough to burn for the required time.

Electric menorahs are great for display purposes, and are a wonderful medium for publicizing the Chanukah miracle. But the Chanukah lights used to fulfill the mitzvah should be real flames fueled by wax or oil – like the flames in the Holy Temple.

 

The Shamash

The shamash – the “attendant” candle that is used to kindle the other lights – sits a bit higher or lower than the other candles, on the ninth branch of the menorah. Many Jews have a tradition to use a beeswax candle for the shamash.

Though the shamash’s primary function has been served once the candles have been lit, we don’t extinguish the shamash. Instead, we set it in its place adjacent to the other lights, ready to “serve” in case a candle blows out. Another reason why we leave the shamash lit is because it is forbidden to use the Chanukah lights for any practical reason. This way, if a candle is needed, the shamash is available for use, preserving the sanctity of the mitzvah lights.

Who

Men and women alike are obligated to participate in the menorah lighting. In some families, the head of the household lights the family menorah while everyone else listens to the blessings and answers, “Amen.” In many other families, all members of the household, including children, light their own menorahs. Either way, it is important for everyone to be present and involved when the Chanukah miracle is festively commemorated.

Where

Light Up Your Home

Light the menorah in your own home. If you are traveling out of town, set up your menorah wherever you will be staying for the night. If you will be spending the night in a Jewish home, you have the option of giving your host a dollar or so, a symbolic contribution towards the menorah expenses, and then you are covered by his/her menorah lighting – or better yet, light your own menorah too. Two candles are more powerful than one!

Students who live in dormitories or their own apartments should kindle menorahs in their own rooms or in a communal dining area. In places where this is prohibited, a rabbi should be consulted as to where to kindle the menorah.

Window or Door

In the home, there are two preferred locations for the menorah.

You can set up the menorah in a central doorway. Place it on a chair or small table near the doorpost that is opposite the mezuzah. This way, when you pass through the doorway, you are surrounded by two mitzvot – the mezuzah and the menorah. Ideally, the menorah lights should be between 12 and 40 inches off the ground.

Or you can set up your menorah on a windowsill facing the street. This option should only be exercised if the window is less than thirty feet above ground-level.

When

The Chanukah lights are kindled every night of Chanukah. The Maccabees chased away the forces of darkness with swords; we do it with light.

The custom of many communities (and such is the Chabad-Lubavitch custom) is to light the menorah shortly after sunset. In other communities, the menorah is kindled after nightfall (approximately thirty minutes after sunset). Either way, the menorah must contain enough fuel to burn for at least thirty minutes after nightfall. Note: The standard Chanukah candles only last approximately 30 minutes. If using those candles, then light after nightfall every night (aside for Friday).

Regardless of the custom you follow on other Chanukah nights, on Friday night the menorah is lit before sunset, and on Saturday night it is lit after nightfall. SeeSpecial Shabbat Rules for more information.

Ideally, you should light the menorah at the earliest possible opportunity. Only delay if you are awaiting the arrival of family members who wish to be present when the menorah is lit. The Chanukah lights may be lit as long as there are people in the streets, or as long as there is another family member awake to participate – but no later than one half hour before dawn. (If no other household member is awake and the streets are already quiet, light the menorah without reciting the blessing.)

Lighting the Menorah

1. Arrange the lights on the menorah. Ensure that there is enough oil, or that the candles are big enough, for the lights to burn until half an hour after nightfall (or, if lighting after nightfall, for one half hour). On the first night, set one candle to the far right of the menorah. On the following night, add a second light to the left of the first one, and then add one light each night of Chanukah – moving from right to left.

2. Gather everyone in the house around the menorah.

3. Light the shamash candle. Then hold it in your right hand (unless you are left-handed).

4. While standing, recite the appropriate blessings.

5. Light the candles. Each night, light the newest (left-most) candle first and continue lighting from left to right. (We add lights to the menorah from right to left, while we light from left to right.)

The Blessings

Before lighting the Chanukah candles, we thank G‑d for giving us this special mitzvah, and for the incredible Chanukah miracles:

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai E-lo-he-nu Me-lech ha-olam a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-tav ve-tzi-va-nu le-had-lik ner Chanukah.

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech ha-olam she-a-sa ni-sim la-avo-te-nu ba-ya-mim ha-hem bi-z’man ha-zeh.

[Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and commanded us to kindle the Chanukah light.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who performed miracles for our forefathers in those days, at this time.]

On the first night of Chanukah, Wednesday November 27, 2013 (or the first time on Chanukah you perform this mitzvah), add the following blessing:

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai E-lo-he-nu Me-lech ha-olam she-heche-ya-nu ve-ki-yi-ma-nu ve-higi-a-nu liz-man ha-zeh.

[Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has granted us life, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this occasion.]

Relish the Lights

After you finish kindling the menorah lights, place the shamash candle in its designated place on the menorah. At this point it is traditional to sing Chanukah hymns such as Haneirot Halaluand orMaoz Tzur.

Linger around the menorah for about half an hour (aside for Friday afternoon, when Shabbat preparations are in full gear). Share some Chanukah stories with your family, enjoy a draidel game and indulge in some traditional hot latkes(fried potato pancakes) orsufganiot (fried donuts)! (See Chanukah Foods.)

For the first half hour after the candles are lit (or until half an hour after nightfall, if the menorah was lit before dark) the menorah should not be transferred from its place. If a flame dies out during this time, it is best to relight it. After this time, the menorah can be moved if necessary, and there’s no need to rekindle extinguished flames.

Many women refrain from performing household chores during the first half hour that the lights are burning, to honor the brave Jewish women who played a significant role in the Chanukah victory.

Special Shabbat Rules

It is forbidden to light a fire on Shabbat, which extends from sunset on Friday evening until nightfall of Saturday night. Therefore, on Friday afternoon, light the menorah before the Shabbat candles. Shabbat candles are traditionally lit eighteen minutes before sundown. Use additional oil or larger candles for the Friday night Chanukah lights, as they must remain lit until one half hour after nightfall – approximately 1½ hours after the Friday afternoon lighting time. Note: The standard 30-minute Chanukah candles cannot be used on Friday.

For the duration of Shabbat, do not relight any flames that have gone out or move the menorah, nor should you prepare the Saturday night Chanukah lights during the Day of Rest.

On Saturday night, light the menorah after Shabbat ends at nightfall. Traditionally, the menorah is kindled immediately after the havdalah service.

 

Blessings on the Kindling of the Menorah

Click here for the blessings in Hebrew, transliteration and translation of the blessings on the kindling of the menorah.

V’al Hanissim

During the eight days of Chanukah, we add the V’al Hanissim (“And for the miracles…”) section in the amidah (daily silent prayers) and in the Grace after Meals. In this section we summarize the miracles of the Maccabee victory, and thank G‑d for the “miracles, redemption, mighty deeds, saving acts and wonders” that He wrought for our ancestors.

Click here for the Hebrew text of the V’al Hanissim, as well as an English translation.

Hallel

Every day of Chanukah, we recite the complete Hallel in the course of the morning prayers. The Hallel is a sequence of praise and gratitude-themed psalms (Psalms 113-118) that is recited on Jewish holidays.

Torah Reading

The Torah is read every day immediately following the Hallel. The Chanukah readings are from the Book of Numbers (7:1-8:4), and discuss the dedication of the Tabernacle, the gifts that the tribal leaders brought in honor of the inauguration, and the command to Aaron to kindle the Tabernacle Menorah daily.

On Chanukah, too, we celebrate the dedication (or, to be precise, the re-dedication) of the Temple by the Maccabees after it had been defiled and contaminated by the Greeks. And the command to Aaron to kindle the Menorah is also an allusion to the Chanukah Menorah, a mitzvah that we have thanks to the bravery of Aaron’s descendants—the priestly Hasmonean family that led the Maccabeean armies in battle against the Greeks.

Click here for the Chanukah readings along with commentary and contemporary insights.

Chanukah Hymns

Various hymns have been composed in honor of Chanukah. The two most popular ones are Maoz Tzur and Haneirot Halalu, which are traditionally sung after the lighting of the Menorah.

Chanukah Gelt

During Chanukah it is customary to give gelt(money) to children, so that we can teach them to give some of it to charity—and just to keep things festive and happy. Some have the admirable custom of gelt-giving each weeknight of Chanukah. In Chabad, it is customary to give gelt every night, but to hand out a heftier sum on the fourth or fifth night.

Click here for some deeper reasons for the Chanukah gelt custom.

On Chanukah, it is also customary to increase one’s daily disbursement to charity.

Chanukah Foods

Oil played a significant role in the Chanukah story—the small jug of oil that miraculously provided fuel for the Temple Menorah for eight days. It is a Jewish tradition to eat foods that reflect the significance of a holiday – such as matzah on Passover, and apple dipped in honey on Rosh Hashanah – and Chanukah is no exception. For at least the last thousand years, Jews have traditionally eaten oily foods on Chanukah.

Among the most popular Chanukah dishes are potato latkes (pancakes) and sufganiot(deep-fried doughnuts).

Actually, oil is also symbolic of the spiritual war waged by the Maccabees. SeeThe War Is All About The Oil for more on this topic.

It is also customary to eat dairy foods on Chanukah, in commemoration of the bravery of Yehudit. Click here to read the story of this brave woman whose daring courage led to a great Maccabee victory.

Click here for traditional Chanukah recipes.

Dreidel Playing Guide

The traditional Chanukah dreidel(spinning top) is a throwback to the times when the Greek armies of King Antiochus controlled the Holy Land, before the Maccabees defeated them and sent them packing. The powerful regime passed a series of laws outlawing the study of Torah and many of the mitzvot. The Jews were compelled to take their Torah learning “underground,” for they knew that a Jew without Torah is like a fish out of water.

Jewish children resorted to learning Torah in outlying areas and forests. Even this plan was not foolproof, for the enemy had many patrols. The children therefore brought along small tops that they would quickly pull out and play with after secreting away their texts, so that they could pretend to be merely playing games.

Our Chanukah dreidel games are a salute to these Jewish heroes of yore.

 

The classic dreidel is a four sided spinning top made of wood, plastic, or the proverbial clay. On the four sides of the dreidel appear four letters from the Hebrew alphabet—nun (נ), gimmel (ג), hey (ה)and shin (ש). These four letters are an acronym for “nes gadol hayah sham”—“a great miracle happened there.”

In Israel, the actual setting of the Chanukah miracle, the last letter,shin, is substituted with a pey (פ), which stands for “po”—”here.”

 

  1. All players sit around the playing area.
  2. The “ante” is equally divided amongst all players.
  3. Everyone takes a turn at spinning the dreidel; the one with the highest spin has first turn. (Nun is highest, then gimmel,hey, and shin.) If there is a tie for highest, those who tied spin again.
  4. Everyone puts one unit of the ante (penny, nut, etc.) into the pot.
  5. The one who has first turn is followed in clockwise direction by all the others.
  6. Player A spins the dreidel while everyone waits in utter suspense (in the interest of speeding up the game, some knock down the dreidel mid-spin instead of waiting for it to come to a rest).

If the dreidel lands on a…

Nun – נ

You’ve just wasted your time. Absolutely nothing happens. You may as well have taken a bathroom break instead of that useless spin. Better luck next time!

Nun stands for the Yiddish word nul, which means zero, nothing, nil. After your exercise in futility it’s time now for the player to your left to take a spin.

If however your dreidel landed on a…

Gimmel – ג

Wow! Amazing! You did it! You get to take the whole pot! Take it quick and then do a little victory dance around the room. Pay no attention to the envious stares you are getting. You are an absolute dreidel pro!

Gimmel stands for gantz, which means whole. Everyone, including you, now puts another unit of the ante into the pot, and the person to your left tries his luck at spinning.

But, it’s hard to be so lucky every time. Sometimes your dreidel will land on a…

Hey – ה

Okay, you could have done better, but you could have done worse. You get to take half of the pot. If the pot has an odd amount of units, don’t try to split that penny, nut, or piece of chocolate in half. Leave it there. Take the high road. Let the others believe that it is beneath you to care…

Hey stands for halb, half. The pot has now been diminished, and it’s time for the player to your left to take a stab at riches.

But don’t complain. The dreidel could have landed on a…

Shin – ש

The absolute worst. The dregs. You now have to put another unit into the pot! You better figure out how to improve your spinning technique before you will be forced to take out a second mortgage on your home.

Shin is for shenk; yes, that means give. Your hope now is that the pot will still be around next time it is your turn to spin. Maybe then you’ll get a gimmel and recoup your losses…

 

The absolute worst. The dregs. You now have to put another unit into the pot! You better figure out how to improve your spinning technique before you will be forced to take out a second mortgage on your home.

Shin is for shenk; yes, that means give. Your hope now is that the pot will still be around next time it is your turn to spin. Maybe then you’ll get a gimmel and recoup your losses…

Useful Chanukah Links

How-To and Tools

Global Chanukah Event Search

Holiday E-Greeting Cards

Chanukah 2013 Calendar

Menorah Lighting Guide

Menorah Lighting Guide (Video)

Chanukah Kids’ Zone

Chanukah Recipes

Chanukah Shopping

Chanukah Study

Chanukah FAQ

Story of Chanukah

Chanukah Stories

Insights & Inspiration

Chanukah Videos

Holiday Songs

Audio Classes

Print   |   Read Online   |   

 

Chabad.org
Chanukah (Hanukkah)
Light Over Darkness
Chanukah - Hanukkah

Chanukah this year is Wednesday evening November 27 – Thursday, December 5.


Chanukah — the eight-day festival of light that begins on the eve of the 25th of the Jewish month of Kislev — celebrates the triumph of light over darkness, of purity overadulteration, of spirituality over materiality.

More than twenty-one centuries ago, the Holy Land was ruled by the Seleucids (Syrian-Greeks), who sought to forcefully Hellenize the people of Israel. Against all odds, a small band of faithful Jews defeated one of the mightiest armies on earth, drove the Greeks from the land, reclaimed the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and rededicated it to the service of G-d.

When they sought to light the Temple’s menorah (the seven branched candelabrum), they found only a single cruse of olive oil that had escaped contamination by the Greeks; miraculously, the one-day supply burned for eight days, until new oil could be prepared under conditions of ritual purity.

To commemorate and publicize these miracles, the sages instituted the festival of Chanukah. At the heart of the festival is the nightly menorah (candelabrum) lighting: a single flame on the first night, two on the second evening, and so on till the eighth night of Chanukah, when all eight lights are kindled.

On Chanukah we also add the Hallel and Al HaNissim in our daily prayers to offer praise and thanksgiving to G-d for “delivering the strong into the hands of the weak, the many into the hands of the few… the wicked into the hands of the righteous.”

Chanukah customs include eating foods fried in oil — latkes (potato pancakes) andsufganiot (doughnuts); playing with the dreidel (a spinning top on which are inscribed the Hebrew letters nungimmelhei and shin, an acronym for Nes Gadol Hayah Sham, “a great miracle happened there”); and the giving of Chanukah gelt, gifts of money, tochildren.

Click here for a comprehensive “How To” guide for the observances and customs of Chanukah

Click here to visit www.Chanukah.org

 

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