Section Jewish History : 24JEWISH ALERTS large selection in each section

Blacks and Jews in the United States: History, Myths, and Realities (pt. 1)

23.01.2014

Speaker: Jerome Chanes
Date: November 3, 2005
Blacks and Jews in the United States: History, Myths, and Realities

This lecture develops a historical context for understanding Black-Jewish relations in America — why, indeed did American Jews speaerhead the civil-rights movement, and what were the factors that caused the alliance to rupture? — and, in analyzing the phenomenon of “Black anti-Semitism,” will explode some myths.

Jerome A. Chanes is Faculty Scholar at the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies at Brandeis University, and is adjunct professor of Jewish Sociology at Yeshiva University and at Barnard College. He is the author of the award-winning A Dark Side of History: Anti-Semitism through the Ages; the monograph A Primer on the American Jewish Community, going into its third edition; A Portrait of the American Jewish Community; and of Anti-Semitism: A Reference Handbook.

Blacks and Jews in the United States: History, Myths, and Realities (pt. 2)

Blacks and Jews in the United States: History, Myths, and Realities (pt. 3)

 

Brody Jewish Center’s exhibit pays tribute to U.S. Army’s inspiring 

The Daily Progress – This is the first time in Jewish history that a government has helped in the publication of the Talmud, which is the source of our being and the length of 

 Novel harks back to Britain’s golden age of Jewishboxers

Haaretz – It featured a series of hard-hitting Jewish champs who were, the article  “I wanted to nod to a time in boxing’s history,” Whitwham says of Bobby’s .

 

‘Never again’ imperatives

Jerusalem Post – We are also asked to learn lessons from that dark period inhistory Two boxes containing pigs’ heads were sent to conspicuously Jewishand Israeli 

The Bible as history

RenewAmerica – And just recently, Professor Gershon Galil, from the Department of Biblical Studies andJewish History at the University of Haifa, deciphered the oldest .

Jewish Museum Commemorates Holocaust Memorial Day

The Moscow Times – The museum does not focus solely on Jewish history but also includes the attached Center for the Avant-Garde, which has organized special exhibits 
For Persian Jews, America Means ‘Religious Pluralism At Its Best’
Capital Public Radio News
Judaism has a rich and millennial history in Iran including the era 2,500 years ago when the first Persian ruler declared religious freedom. But during the Islamic Revolution, as the last Persian monarch left Iran — 35 years ago this month 
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Holocaust survivor accuses Hungary of trying to rewrite history, wants to 
Charleston Post Courier
Braham, born in Romania in 1922 and now Professor Emeritus at the Center for JewishStudies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, said in an open letter addressed to executives of the memorial center that the “straw that broke the 
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Untold Story of Jewish Feminist Pioneers
Jewish Daily Forward (blog)
Historian Melissa R. Klapper recently won a National Jewish Book Award for “Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940.” In the book, Klapper, a professor of history at Rowan University in New Jersey, shows us 
See all stories on this topic »
The Bible as history
RenewAmerica
And just recently, Professor Gershon Galil, from the Department of Biblical Studies andJewish History at the University of Haifa, deciphered the oldest Hebrew inscription yet found in Jerusalem. The translation was of early Hebrew texts appearing on 
See all stories on this topic »
Jewish Museum Commemorates Holocaust Memorial Day
The Moscow Times
The museum does not focus solely on Jewish history but also includes the attached Center for the Avant-Garde, which has organized special exhibits of modern art, including some highlights of the 5th Moscow Biennale such as the exhibit “Foreigners 
See all stories on this topic »
Pig’s head sent to Rome synagogue in apparent anti-Semitic incident
JNS.org
The leader of Italy’s Jewish Community, Renzo Gattegna, called the incident “repugnant” and “barbaric,” comparing it to mafia-style messages. “They wanted to attack the religion, culture and Jewish history. They are cowards,” he said. Lisa Palmieri 
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‘Never again’ imperatives
Jerusalem Post
As Palestinian Media Watch has shown, school history books and media sources regularly omit the fact that Jews were systematically murdered during World War II. Some Palestinian leaders have compared Israeli control over Palestinian populations on the 
See all stories on this topic »

Pig’s head sent to Rome synagogue in apparent anti-Semitic incident

JNS.org – The leader of Italy’s Jewish Community, Renzo Gattegna, called the incident  “They wanted to attack the religion, culture and Jewish history. They are ..

Section This Day, In Jewish History : 24JEWISH ALERTS large selection in each section

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: Holocaust survivor recalls horrors of Nazi camp ordeal

27.01.2014

As the world marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day, one survivor has been speaking about her ordeal of living in a Nazi concentration camp. Rina Quint, born in central Poland, was just four years old when World War Two broke out in 1939. She recalls the moment she entered the Bergen-Belsen camp in north-western Germany.

Scholar Explores Russian Writer Isaac Babel’s World

 

12.02.2010

The Russian-Jewish pacifist explored the “horror and beauty” of violence in his short stories and plays, says Stanford scholar Gregory Friedin.

Stanford University:
http://www.stanford.edu/

Stanford News:
http://news.stanford.edu/

Stanford University Channel on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/stanford

Reading Isaac Babel

08.07.2013

Andrei Malaev-Babel explains how his grandfather, Isaac Babel, wrote about the creative process. Malaev-Babel then shares his belief that creativity is the highest force in this world.

To learn more about the Wexler Oral History Project, visit:http://www.yiddishbookcenter.org/tell…

This Day in Jewish History / Acclaimed Russian-Jewish writer Isaac Babel 
Haaretz
This Day in Jewish History / Acclaimed Russian-Jewish writer Isaac Babel sentenced to death in Moscow. The author of ‘Odessa Tales,’ often cited as one of the finest stylists of the 20th century, fell foul of Soviet authorities in the 1930s. By David B 
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Rabbi Manis Friedman on Tanya

06.12.2012

Visit http://11213.org/ for new episodes every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

Learn about the radical revolution of Tanya.

This video is part of the series Tanya For Teens:http://11213.org/tag/tanya-for-teens/

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dailychassidus great videos selection . Select your shiur!Rav Paltiel

 

KABBALAH of the HEART | Sefer Tanya

 29.05.2007

Who’s the boss of your body: your heart or your brain? Rabbi Tzvi Freeman explores the untapped powers of the mind.

LESSONS IN TANYA:

   hayomyom

 

LESSONS IN TANYA: Monday, January 27, 2014

Chabad.org
Today’s Tanya Lesson
Shevat 26, 5774 · January 27, 2014
Likutei Amarim, middle of Chapter 25

Yet one may argue that in reality this is no option at all. The Talmud states that when one sins because he relies on subsequent teshuvah, G‑d does not allow him to practiceteshuvah. Since he cannot rely on this, he must sacrifice his life so as not to remainpermanently separated from G‑d through idolatry. With a minor sin, however, the separation from G‑d that it causes is in any case temporary, even without recourse toteshuvah.

We are thus once again left with our original question: How can it be said that the same fear of separation from G‑d that motivates a Jew to sacrifice his life with regard to idolatry, can also motivate him to refrain from even a minor sin? The two cases are altogether different: the former causes a lasting separation, and the latter, a momentary one.

The Alter Rebbe answers this objection by clarifying the Talmudic statement on which it is based. The Talmud does not imply, he explains, that the sinner who relies onteshuvah utterly loses his ability to repent, but rather that the Divine assistance usually granted to a penitent sinner is withheld from him.

Thus one could, after all, submit to coercion and practice idolatry, and rely onteshuvah to save him from a lasting separation from G‑d. Yet no Jew would take advantage of this resource; the love of G‑d innate in every Jew dictates that he sacrifice his life rather than bear the temporary separation caused by idolatry.

This discussion is contained in the following paragraphs.

ואף שהאומר אחטא ואשוב, אין מספיקין כו‘

(1Although the Talmud states that2 “He who says, ’I will sin and repent, sin and repent,‘ is not given an opportunity to do so,”

היינו שאין מחזיקים ידו להיות לו שעת הכושר לעשות תשובה

yet this means merely that G‑d does not aid such a sinner, granting him the auspicious occasion to repent.

Generally, G‑d grants one who wishes to repent the necessary power and the opportune moment to realize his good intentions. However, where one’s reliance onteshuvah formed the basis for his sin, he is lent neither the strength nor the opportunity.

אבל אם דחק השעה ועשה תשובה, אין לך דבר שעומד בפני התשובה

If, however, he seizes the opportunity himself and he repents, 3 “Nothing can stand in the way of repentance.”

Thus, even in the case of idolatry one could conceivably rely on teshuvah to prevent a lasting separation from G‑d.

ואף על פי כן, כל איש ישראל מוכן ומזומן למסור נפשו על קדושת ה’

Nevertheless, every Jew is prepared and ready to suffer martyrdom for the sanctification of G‑d’s Name,

שלא להשתחוות לעבודה זרה אפילו לפי שעה ולעשות תשובה אחר כך

and will not perform an idolatrous act lit., “to bow down before an idol” even temporarily, with the intention of repenting afterwards — indicating that the fear of even a temporary separation from G‑d is sufficient motivation for self-sacrifice.

והיינו מפני אור ה‘ המלובש בנפשם כנ״ל, שאינו בבחינת זמן ושעה כלל אלא למעלה מהזמן, ושליט ומושל עליו כנודע

This is because of the Divine light which is clothed in his soul, as explained above, which does not come within the realm of time at all, but transcends time, and therefore in relation to this light every action is eternal;furthermore, as is known this Divine light rules and dominates time — not only is it not governed by the laws of time, but on the contrary it governs them.

Thus, an action which took but a moment (and, judged by temporal standards, has no value) can become more momentous than one which takes much longer. 4

Since the Divine light clothed in the soul transcends and dominates time, it does not permit any separation from G‑d, no matter how short its duration.

The discussion until now centered on the category of “turning away from evil.” The Alter Rebbe showed how one could utilize his hidden love of G‑d in refraining from sin. He now goes on to the category of “doing good,” discussing the use of the hidden love in leading one to perform all the positive commandments.

FOOTNOTES
1. Parentheses are in the original text.
2. Yoma 85b.
3. Cf. Talmud Yerushalmi, Pe’ah 1:1.
4. Based on a comment by the Rebbe.
The Tanya of Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, elucidated by Rabbi Yosef Wineberg    More articles…  |   RSS Listing of Newest Articles by this Author

Translated from Yiddish by Rabbi Levy Wineberg and Rabbi Sholom B. Wineberg. Edited by Uri Kaploun.
Published and copyright by Kehot Publication Society, all rights reserved.

Select Section Shiurim Hayom Yom, Today’s Day ,Today’s Mitzvah : 24JEWISH ALERTS large selection videos and feeds in each section

Daily Mussar

Daily Zohar

  great videos selection . Select your shiur !

Shiur with Rabbi Avraham Gaon
Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshiva Etzion
http://www.YeshivaEtzion.com

“TODAY’S DAY”:

   hayomyom

TODAY IN JUDAISM: Monday, January 27, 2014

Chabad.org
Today is: Monday, Shvat 26, 5774 · January 27, 2014
Today in Jewish History

• Passing of the Taz (1667)

Shevat 26 is the yahrtzeit (anniversary of the passing) of Rabbi Dovid ben Shmuel Halevi (1586-1667), a primary Halachic authority, known as Taz after his workTurei Zahav (“Rows of Gold”) — a commentary on Rabbi Yosef Caro’s Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law).

Links: Rabbi David Halevi (Taz)

Daily Quote
Rabban Gamliel the son of Rabbi Judah HaNassi would say: Beautiful is the study of Torah with the way of the world, for the toil of them both causes sin to be forgotten. Ultimately, all Torah study that is not accompanied with work is destined to cease and to cause sin.

– Ethics of the Fathers 2:2

Daily Study

Chitas and Rambam for today:

Chumash: with Rashi
• English / Hebrew Linear Translation | Video Class

Tehillim: Chapter 119, Verses 97-176
• Hebrew text
• English text

Tanya: Likutei Amarim, middle of Chapter 25
• English Text: Lessons in Tanya
• Hebrew Text
• Audio Class: Listen | Download
• Video Class

Rambam:
• Sefer Hamitzvos:
English Text | Hebrew Text |  Audio: Listen | Download | Video Class
• 1 Chapter: Kelim Chapter 11
English Text | Hebrew Text |  Audio: Listen | Download | Video Class
• 3 Chapters: Teshuvah Chapter Four, Teshuvah Chapter Five, Teshuvah Chapter Six
English Text | Hebrew Text |  Audio: Listen | Download

Hayom Yom:
• English Text | Video Class

DAILY MITZVAH (Maimonides): Monday, January 27, 201

Chabad.org
Today’s Mitzvah
Shevat 26, 5774 · January 27, 2014
A daily digest of Maimonides’ classic work “Sefer Hamitzvot”

Important Message Regarding This Lesson

The Daily Mitzvah schedule runs parallel to the daily study of 3 chapters of Maimonides’ 14-volume code. There are instances when the Mitzvah is repeated a few days consecutively while the exploration of the same Mitzvah continues in the in-depth track.

Positive Commandment 73
Confessing Sins

“And he shall confess that he has sinned”—Leviticus 5:5.

One who has sinned is obligated to verbally confess and say, “Please, G‑d, I have sinned by doing…” The individual should then elaborate to the best of his ability and ask G‑d for atonement. This mitzvah applies whether the sin was against G‑d or against a fellow man.

Even in the times of the Holy Temple when a person would bring a sin-offering to attain forgiveness, he was still required to orally confess his sin. The same for those who were guilty of capital offenses, they were asked to confess their sin prior to their execution.

Full text of this Mitzvah »