Section Jewish History : 24JEWISH ALERTS large selection in each section

Konrad Emil Bloch, 1964 Nobel Laureate in Medicine (A Meditation)

28.11.2011

Abortion’s Handmaid: The Depersonalized World of Dianna Murphy

http://www.docsociety.org/documents/A…

இڿڰۣ-ڰۣ——

Bloch was born in Neisse (Nysa) in the German Empire’s Prussian Province of Silesia. He was the second child of a middle class family. From 1930 to 1934, he studied chemistry at the Technical University of Munich. In 1934, due to the Nazi persecutions of Jews, he fled to the Schweizerische Forschungsinstitut in Davos, Switzerland, before moving to the United States in 1936. Later he was appointed to the department of biological chemistry at Yale Medical School.

In the United States, Bloch enrolled at Columbia University, and received a Ph.D in biochemistry in 1938. He taught at Columbia from 1939 to 1946. From there he went to the University of Chicago and then to Harvard University as Higgins Professor of Biochemistry in 1954, a post he held until 1982. After retirement at Harvard, he served as the Mack and Effie Campbell Tyner Eminent Scholar Chair in the College of Human Sciences at Florida State University.

Bloch shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 1964 with Feodor Lynen, for their discoveries concerning the mechanism and regulation of the cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. Fellow of the Royal Society in 1985. In 1988, he was awarded the National Medal of Science.

Bloch died in Lexington, Massachusetts of congestive heart failure, aged 88.

*** Prayer and Torah study groups will continue to be held around the world in the merit of Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin and his family.

Louis Dembitz Brandeis Quote (A Meditation)

27.11.2011

Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 — October 5, 1941) was an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1916 to 1939.

He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, to Jewish immigrant parents who raised him in a secular mode. He enrolled at Harvard Law School, graduating at the age of twenty with the highest grade average in the college’s history.

Brandeis settled in Boston where he became a recognized lawyer through his work on progressive social causes. Starting in 1890, he helped develop the “right to privacy” concept by writing a Harvard Law Review article of that title, and was thereby credited by legal scholar Roscoe Pound as having accomplished “nothing less than adding a chapter to our law”. He later published a book entitled Other People’s Money And How the Bankers Use It, suggesting ways of curbing the power of large banks and money trusts, which partly explains why he later fought against powerful corporations, monopolies, public corruption, and mass consumerism, all of which he felt were detrimental to American values and culture. He also became active in the Zionist movement, seeing it as a solution to antisemitism in Europe and Russia, while at the same time being a way to “revive the Jewish spirit.”

When his family’s finances became secure, he began devoting most of his time to public causes and was later dubbed the “People’s Lawyer.” He insisted on serving on cases without pay so that he would be free to address the wider issues involved. The Economist magazine calls him “A Robin Hood of the law.” Among his notable early cases were actions fighting railroad monopolies; defending workplace and labor laws; helping create the Federal Reserve System; and presenting ideas for the new Federal Trade Commission (FTC). He achieved recognition by submitting a case brief, later called the “Brandeis Brief,” which relied on expert testimony from people in other professions to support his case, thereby setting a new precedent in evidence presentation.

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson nominated Brandeis to become a member of the Supreme Court. However, his nomination was bitterly contested, partly because, as Justice William O. Douglas wrote, “Brandeis was a militant crusader for social justice whoever his opponent might be. He was dangerous not only because of his brilliance, his arithmetic, his courage. He was dangerous because he was incorruptible. . . [and] the fears of the Establishment were greater because Brandeis was the first Jew to be named to the Court.” He was eventually confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 47 to 22 on June 1, 1916, and became one of the most famous and influential figures ever to serve on the high court. His opinions were, according to legal scholars, some of the “greatest defenses” of freedom of speech and the right to privacy ever written by a member of the Supreme Court.

*** Prayer and Torah study groups will continue to be held around the world in the merit of Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin and his family.

Gertrude Belle Elion, 1988 Nobel Laureate in Medicine (A Meditation)

28.11.2011

Gertrude Belle Elion (January 23, 1918 — February 21, 1999) was an American biochemist and pharmacologist, and a 1988 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Working alone as well as with George H. Hitchings, Elion developed a multitude of new drugs, using innovative research methods that would later lead to the development of the AIDS drug AZT.

Born in New York City to immigrant parents, she graduated from Hunter College in 1937 and New York University (M.Sc.) in 1941. Unable to obtain a graduate research position due to her gender, she worked as a lab assistant and a high school teacher. Later, she left to work as an assistant to George H. Hitchings at the Burroughs-Wellcome pharmaceutical company (now GlaxoSmithKline). She never obtained a formal Ph.D., but was later awarded an honorary Ph.D from Polytechnic University of New York in 1989 and honorary SD degree from Harvard university in 1998.

Rather than relying on trial-and-error, Elion and Hitchings used the differences in biochemistry between normal human cells and pathogens (disease-causing agents) to design drugs that could kill or inhibit the reproduction of particular pathogens without harming the host cells.

Elion’s inventions include:

-6-mercaptopurine (Purinethol), the first treatment for leukemia.

-Azathioprine (Imuran), the first immuno-suppressive agent, used for organ transplants.

-Allopurinol (Zyloprim), for gout.

-Pyrimethamine (Daraprim), for malaria.

-Trimethoprim (Septra), for meningitis, septicemia, and bacterial infections of the urinary and respiratory tracts.

-Acyclovir (Zovirax), for viral herpes.

In 1988 Elion received the Nobel Prize in Medicine, together with Hitchings and Sir James Black. Other awards include the National Medal of Science (1991) and the Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award (1997). In 1991 she became the first woman to be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

In Tom Brokaw’s Greatest Generation, there is a chapter devoted to her.

Gertrude Elion died in North Carolina in 1999, aged 81. She had moved to the Research Triangle in 1970, and for a time served as a research professor at Duke University. She was unmarried.

*** Prayer and Torah study groups will continue to be held around the world in the merit of Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin and his family.

Rita Levi-Montalcini, 1986 Nobel Laureate in Medicine (A Meditation))

28.11.2011

the prosecutor pervertor

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ft4BVM…

இڿڰۣ-ڰۣ——

Rita Levi-Montalcini (born 22 April 1909), Knight Grand Cross is an Italian neurologist who, together with colleague Stanley Cohen, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF). Since 2001, she has also served in the Italian Senate as a Senator for Life.

Today she is the oldest living Nobel laureate and the first ever to reach a 100th birthday. On 22 April 2009 she was feted with a 100th birthday party at Rome’s city hall.

Born in Turin to a Jewish family, together with her twin sister Paola she was the youngest of four children. Her parents were Adamo Levi, an electrical engineer and gifted mathematician, and Adele Montalcini, a painter.

Levi-Montalcini decided to attend medical school after seeing a close family friend die of cancer, overcoming the objections of her father who believed that “a professional career would interfere with the duties of a wife and mother”. She enrolled in the Turin medical school in 1930. After graduating in 1936, she went to work as Giuseppe Levi’s assistant, but her academic career was cut short by Benito Mussolini’s 1938 Manifesto of Race and the subsequent introduction of laws barring Jews from academic and professional careers.

During World War II, she conducted experiments from a home laboratory, studying the growth of nerve fibers in chicken embryos which laid the groundwork for much of her later research. (She describes this experience decades later in the 1995 science documentary Death by Design/The Life and Times of Life and Times, which also features her identical twin sister Paola, who had entered a decades-long career in the arts.) Her first genetics laboratory was in her bedroom at her home. In 1943, her family fled south to Florence, and she set up a laboratory there also. Her family returned to Turin in 1945.

In September 1946, Levi-Montalcini accepted an invitation to Washington University in St. Louis, under the supervision of Professor Viktor Hamburger. Although the initial invitation was for one semester, she stayed for thirty years. It was there that she did her most important work: isolating the nerve growth factor (NGF) from observations of certain cancerous tissues that cause extremely rapid growth of nerve cells in 1952. She was made a Full Professor in 1958, and in 1962, established a research unit in Rome, dividing the rest of her time between there and St. Louis.

From 1961 to 1969 she directed the Research Center of Neurobiology of the CNR (Rome), and from 1969 to 1978 the Laboratory of Cellular Biology.

Rita Levi-Montalcini founded the European Brain Research Institute, covering the appointment of president.

Her role in this institute was at the center of some criticism from some parts of the scientific community in 2010.

Controversies were raised by the collaboration of Prof. Montalcini with the Italian Pharmaceutical Factory Fidia.

Since 1975 the scientist promoted the drug Cronassial produced by Fidia from bovine brain. The drug turned out some years later to be able to cause a severe neurological syndrome (Guillain-Barré syndrome). For this reason Germany banned Cronassial in 1983, followed by other countries. Italy prohibited the drug only in 1993.

This episode raised serious critics to Rita Levi-Montalcini.

On 1 August 2001 she was appointed as Senator for Life by the President of the Italian Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi.

On 28–29 April 2006, Levi-Montalcini, aged 97, attended the opening assembly of the newly-elected Senate, at which the President of the Senate was elected; she declared her preference for the centre-left candidate Franco Marini. Levi-Montalcini, who is the senior member of the Upper House, chose not to be the temporary president on this occasion. She actively takes part in the Upper House discussions, unless busy in academic activities around the world. Due to her support of the government of Romano Prodi, she was often criticized by some right-wing senators, who accused her of “saving” the government when the government’s exiguous majority in the Senate was at risk. She has been frequently insulted in public, and on blogs, since 2006, by both center-right senators such as Francesco Storace, and far-right bloggers for her age and Jewish origins.

Levi-Montalcini is currently the oldest living and the longest-lived Nobel laureate who, though hard of hearing and nearly blind, recently vowed to remain a political force in her country.

She is an agnostic, although on Sunday 17 January 2010 she was present in Rome’s main synagogue, during the official visit of pope Benedict XVI.

*** Prayer and Torah study groups will continue to be held around the world in the merit of Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin and his family.

Paul Ehrlich, 1908 Nobel Laureate in Medicine (A Meditation)

27.11.2011

Paul Ehrlich (14 March 1854 — 20 August 1915) was a German scientist in the fields of hematology, immunology, and chemotherapy, and Nobel laureate. He is noted for curing syphilis and for his research in autoimmunity, calling it “horror autotoxicus”. He coined the term chemotherapy and popularized the concept of a magic bullet.

Paul Ehrlich was born into a Jewish family in Strehlen, in the German Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Silesia (now in Poland). As a schoolboy (inspired by his cousin Karl eigert who owned one of the first microtomes) he became fascinated by the process of staining microscopic tissue substances. He kept that interest during his studies at the universities of Wroclaw (Breslau), Strasbourg, Freiburg im Breisgau and Leipzig.

In his dissertation at the University of Leipzig, he picked up the topic again (“Contributions to the Theory and Practice of Histological Staining”, Beiträge zur Theorie und Praxis der histologischen Färbung). He married Hedwig Pinkus (then aged 19) in 1883. The couple had two daughters, named Stephanie and Marianne. After his clinical education and habilitation (“The Need of the Organism for Oxygen “, Das Sauerstoffbedürfnis des Organismus) at the Charité in Berlin in 1886 he received a call from Robert Koch to join the Institute of Infectious Diseases in Berlin (1891).

Ehrlich spent two years in Egypt, recovering from tuberculosis. Thereafter he worked with his friend Emil Adolf von Behring on the development of a diphtheria serum. The serum was successfully used during an epidemic in Germany. Ehrlich skillfully transformed diphtheria antitoxin into an effective preparation, his first world renown achievement. However, von Behring cheated Ehrlich out of both recognition and financial reward. Only von Behring received the first Nobel Prize in Medicine, in 1901, for contributions in research of diphtheria.

These works inspired Ehrlich’s famous side-chain theory (Seitenkettentheorie) from 1897. This theory explained the effects of serum and enabled measurement of the amount of antigen. In 1896 Ehrlich became the director of the newly founded Institute of Serum Research and Examination (Institut für Serumforschung und Serumprüfung) in Steglitz (Berlin). In 1899 the institute was moved to Frankfurt (Main) and extended into the Royal Institute of Experimental Therapy (Institut für experimentelle Therapie). Here Ehrlich researched chemotherapy and infectious diseases. In 1904 Ehrlich became honorary professor of the University of Göttingen.

Ehrlich received the Nobel Prize for Medicine together with Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov in 1908. In 1906 he discovered the structural formula of atoxyl, a chemical compound which had been shown to be able to treat sleeping sickness. Following this discovery, he tried to create a less toxic version of the medicament. In 1909 he and his student Sahachiro Hata developed Salvarsan, a treatment effective against syphilis. Discovered in the fall of 1909, Salvarsan was in clinical use by 1910. Salvarsan proved to be amazingly effective, particularly when compared with the conventional therapy of mercury salts. Manufactured by Hoechst AG, Salvarsan became the most widely prescribed drug in the world. It was the most effective drug for treating syphilis until penicillin became available in the 1940s. His work illuminated the existence of the blood-brain barrier.

*** Prayer and Torah study groups will continue to be held around the world in the merit of Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin and his family.

 

The Disappearing Places of Our Jewish Past in the Old Country
Jewish Daily Forward
I acted because I felt that a part of Jewish history — my Jewish history — was being destroyed. I acted because I knew that if I did not do something about it, two generations from now there would be nothing Jewish left in Bardejov except the 
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Jewish Impact on Chattanooga is Topic of March 3 CAHA/Public Library Program
The Chattanoogan
A program on “The Jewish Impact on Chattanooga: A Historical Perspective” will be presented on Monday, March 3 at 6pm at the downtown Public Library, 1001 Broad Street. The Chattanooga Area Historical Association and the Local History and Genealogy 
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Students Get an Eye-Opening Examination of Ancient Artifacts
Chabad.org
What do you get when you bring together a rabbi, a museum curator, a Ph.D. candidate and two-dozen college students? A tour of Jewish history that includes ancient clay figurines, fragments of medieval Judeo-Arabic manuscripts and a good dose of 
See all stories on this topic »

Jewish history, art and culture featured at Limmud
Canadian Jewish News (blog)
WINNIPEG — The Winnipeg Jewish community’s fourth annual Limmud weekend (March 1-2) will feature a wide variety of speakers and topics, including Israel advocacy, Jewish history, religion, culture, art and dance. The list of speakers combines local 
See all stories on this topic »

Jewish history, art and culture featured at Limmud
Canadian Jewish News (blog)
WINNIPEG — The Winnipeg Jewish community’s fourth annual Limmud weekend (March 1-2) will feature a wide variety of speakers and topics, including Israel advocacy, Jewish history, religion, culture, art and dance. The list of speakers combines local 
See all stories on this topic »
 
First government-backed Jewish Theology school in Germany hailed as 
Fox News
The opening of the first government-backedSchool of Jewish Theology in Germany has been hailed by the school’s president as “a historical milestone.” The new school at the University of Potsdam marks the first time Jewish theology has been taught at a 
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Jewish/Palestinian history without borders
Al-Monitor
According to reports on Feb. 23, the demand that the Palestinians recognize Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people is one of the biggest obstacles standing in the way of US Secretary of State John Kerry in formulating an agreement in principle.
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History of Jews and comic books at Morristown Jewish center
New Jersey Hills
MORRISTOWN – A History of Jews and Comic Books will be held ay 9:45 a.m. Sunday, March 9, at the Morristown Jewish Center Bet Yisrael (MJCBY), 177 Speedwell Ave. Iconic superheroes like Superman, Batman and Captain America were created by 
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Why there’s a new edition of Jewish baseball cards
San Diego Jewish World
There are also cards featuring artifacts from Chasing Dreams, the major exhibition at Philadelphia’s National Museum of American Jewish History, with items on loan from the American Jewish Historical Society. The two institutions jointly sponsor this 
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Students Get an Eye-Opening Examination of Ancient Artifacts
Chabad.org
What do you get when you bring together a rabbi, a museum curator, a Ph.D. candidate and two-dozen college students? A tour of Jewish history that includes ancient clay figurines, fragments of medieval Judeo-Arabic manuscripts and a good dose of 
See all stories on this topic »
Traces of Jewish Life Vanishing in Slovakia
Jewish Daily Forward
I acted because I felt that a part of Jewish history — my Jewish history — was being destroyed. I acted because I knew that if I did not do something about it, two generations from now there would be nothing Jewish left in Bardejov except the 
See all stories on this topic »
Jewish Women’s Leadership Conference helps 100-plus build workforce skills
Diamondback Online
The event closed with learning groups aimed at empowerment and Lott taught a session called “Badass Women in Jewish History.” Lauren Mishan, Sigma Delta Tau’s president, said she spoke with Bernstein in January about her sorority co-sponsoring the 
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British Jews: Showing Green Line Is Not ‘Insane’
Jewish Daily Forward (blog)
Throughout our history, young Jewish voices have played a vital role in shaping theJewish story. Young people lead and teach other young people and take on significant leadership roles. Youth empowerment is highly valued, and it was with this feeling 
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Visiting Tampa Bay’s historic legacy
Canadian Jewish News (blog)
Most snowbirds heading to Tampa Bay are looking for sun and a little poolside lounging, but for culture and history buffs, there’s another fascinating activity that’s easy to do – search out the area’s Jewish roots. In the city’s historic district of 
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