Section This Day, In Jewish History : 24JEWISH ALERTS large selection in each section

Mitnagdim Hasidim Maskilim Cultural Geography of Jewish Eastern Europe Henry Abramson

History lecture delivered by Dr. Henry Abramson to the Broward County Jewish Genealogical Society on April 21, 2013. Presents overview of three principal intellectual orientations present in Jewish Eastern Europe during the 19th century: the traditionalist Mitnagdim, the innovative Hasidim, and the modernizing Maskilim.

This Day in Jewish History / Founder of medieval Hasidism dies

Haaretz
This Day in Jewish History / Founder of medieval Hasidism dies. The school of mystical thought flourished in western Germany, though it’s not entirely .

Judah ben Samuel of Regensburg

From Wikipedia,

Judah ben Samuel of Regensburg (1150 in Speyer – February 22, 1217[1] in Regensburg), also called HeHasid or ‘the Pious’ in Hebrew, was a leader of the Chassidei Ashkenaz, a movement of Jewish mysticism in Germany considered different from kabbalistic mysticism because it emphasizes specific prayer and moral conduct.

Judah settled in Regensburg in 1195. He wrote Sefer Hasidim (Book of the Pious), Sefer Gematriyot (a book on astrology) and Sefer Hakavod (Book of Glory), the latter has been lost and is only known by quotations that other authors have made from it. His most prominent students were Elazar Rokeach and Moses ben Jacob of Coucy.

udah was descended from an old family of kabbalists from Northern Italy that had settled in Germany. His grandfather Kalonymus was a scholar and parnas in Speyer (died 1126). His father Samuel, also called HeHasid (“the pious”), HaKadosh, and HaNabi,[2] was president of a bet ha-midrash in Speyer, and from him Judah, together with his brother Abraham, received his early instruction. Samuel[3] died while Judah was still young.[4] About 1195 the latter left his native place and settled in Regensburg (Ratisbon), on account of an “accident”[5] – most probably a ritual murder accusation Feb. 13 1195 (see e.g. Israel Yuval: Two Nations in Your Womb (2006) p. 171) and the following persecution experienced by the Jews of Speyer.Photo by Wikipedia Read More Button--orange

The Secrets of Jewish Brownsville

Jewish Daily Forward
What fewer people know is that Brownsville has a vibrant Jewish history: When … Thatday, dressed in a short navy rain jacket, khakis and brown lace-up … Members of this blackHebrew congregation are practicing Jews who are …

File:Street market - Brownsville - 1962.jpgBrownsville, Brooklyn

From Wikipedia

Brownsville is a residential neighborhood located in eastern Brooklyn, New York City. The total land area is 1.163 square miles (3.01 km2), and the ZIP codes for the neighborhood are 11212 and 11233. Brownsville is bordered by Atlantic Avenue to the north, on the Bedford–Stuyvesant and Bushwick border; East 98th Street/Ralph Avenue to the west, on the Flatbush, Weeksville, and Crown Heights borders; the freight rail Bay Ridge Branch of the Long Island Rail Road and Linden Boulevard to the south, adjacent to the neighborhood of Canarsie; and Van Sinderen Avenue to the east, next to East New York.[2] It is part of Brooklyn  Photo by Wikipedia  Read More Button--orange

An Extensive Tour Of Brooklyn New York City By Bicycle

“The Education of Hyman Kaplan” NCFCA Humorous Interpretation

This Day in Jewish History / ‘Joys of Yiddish’ author Leo Rosten dies

Haaretz
Leo Calvin Rosten was born on April 11, 1908, in Lodz, then part of the Russian empire,today in Poland. He was the first of the two children of Samuel …

File:Leo Rosten 1959.JPGLeo Rosten

From Wikipedia

Leo Calvin Rosten (April 11, 1908 – February 19, 1997) was born in Łódź, Russian Empire (now Poland) and died in New York City. He was a teacher and academic, but is best known as a humorist in the fields of scriptwriting, storywriting, journalism and Yiddishlexicography.

Rosten was born into a Yiddish-speaking family in what is now Poland, but emigrated to the U.S. with his family in 1911 at age three. His parents were Samuel C. Rosenberg and Ida (Freundlich) Rosenberg, both trade unionists. They opened a knitting shop in the Greater Lawndale area of Chicago, where Rosten and his younger sister grew up among other working-class Jewish families. Like their neighbors, the children spoke both English and Yiddish. Rosten showed an interest in books and language very early, and began writing stories when he was only nine. He put himself through school and earned degrees from both the University of Chicago, where he obtained his doctorate, and the London School of Economics. Photo by Wikipedia Read More Button--orange

Jewish History Manifesto by Dr. Henry Abramson

15.02.2015
“Imagine that, while browsing in the library, you come across one book unlike the rest, which catches your eye because on its spine is written the name of your family. Intrigued, you open it and see many pages written by different hands in many languages. You start reading it, and gradually you begin to understand what it is. It i the story each generation of your ancestors has told for the sake of the next, so that everyone born into this family can learn where they came from, what happened to them, what they lived for and why. As you turn the pages, you reach the last, which carries no entry but a heading. It bears your name.” Jonathan Sacks, _A Letter in the Scroll_

This Day in Jewish History / The ‘mother’ of collective farming in the Land of Israel dies

Haaretz
Manya Shochat, a daring pioneer from the Second Aliya, also furthered the development ofJewish self-defense. By David B. Green | Feb. 17, 2015 …

Berlin-Jerusalem (sub ita), Amos Gitai FILM COMPLETO

Two women, the German Else Lasker-Schüler and the Russian Mania Shohat, are each travelling to Jerusalem, a mythical but also very real city that they must confront… Based on the biographies of these two women, one of the first Russian Zionists and a German Expressionist poetess, the film moves back and forth between the dim cafés of Berlin in the 1930s and the hills of Jerusalem. Berlin Jerusalem or the history of crushed utopias…

“In Berlin Jerusalem, the city [of Jerusalem] organises the narrative: that is where the film’s two heroines want to go, where they meet each other and where the narrative ends. In this film, Jerusalem appears in all its chimerical aspects. It is a mythical city, Else Lasker-Schüler’s poetic city, but also the city of the first Jewish migrants, an Arab city and a contemporary megalopolis. Its appearance in the end and its mirage, which appears from the beginning, bind the entire narrative into parallel layers (…). Reality erupts into the film as something sudden and lethal, like the gunshots, the explosions, the chaos (…) A conventional world of ruins is transformed into a convulsive world of violence.”
Mikhail Iampolski, “The Road to Jerusalem”, in “The Films of Amos Gitai”, edited by Paul Willemen, BFI, London, 1993

Cast Liza Kreuzer, Rivka Neuman, Markus Stockhausen, Benjamin Levy, Vernon Dobtcheff, Veronica Lazare, Bernard Eisenschitz, la Pina Bausch Company Screenplay Amos Gitai, Gudie Lawaetz Cinematography Henri Alekan, Nurith Aviv Sound Antoine Bonfanti Music Markus Stockhausen Editing Luc Barnier Production design Marc Petit Jean, Emanuel Amrami Costumes Gisela Storch Production Agav Films, Channel Four (UK), La Sept (France), Nova Films (Italy), Rai2 (Italy), Orthel Films, NOS (The Netherlands) Executive producer(s) Laurent Truchot Producer(s) Ilan Moscovitch, Amos Gitai

Festivals
Venice : Biennale di Venezia / Mostra d’arte cinematografica 1989 – In competition. Critics’ Award
Istanbul International Film Festival 1989 – Grand Prix

File:Manya Shochat.jpgManya Shochat

From Wikipedia,

Manya Shochat (1880–1961) was a Belarusian-Jewish politician and the “mother” of the collective settlement in Palestine, the forerunner of the kibbutz movement.

Manya Wilbuszewitch (also Mania, Wilbuszewicz/Wilbushewitz; later Shochat) was born in the Grodno Governorate of the Russian Empire (present-day Belarus) to middle-class Jewish parents, and grew up on the family estate of “Łosośna”. One brother, Isaac, studied agriculture in Russia. He was expelled for slapping a professor who, in the course of a lecture, stated that the zhids (a derogatory term for Jews) were sucking the blood of the farmers in Ukraine. In late 1882, he left for Palestine and joined the Bilumovement. His letters home were a powerful influence on young Manya.[1] Another brother, the engineer Gedaliah, went there in 1892, and helped fund his younger siblings’ education. As a young adult, she went…….Photo by Wikipedia  Read More Button--orange

 

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