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Celebrate 60 years of NCSY at the historic Shabbaton this Spring. Sign up online at your regional website or go to http://www.ncsy.org

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A fantastic group of Young Adults from Chabad NDG in the heart of Montreal’s trendy Monkland Village went down to Crown Heights, New York for an incredible Shabbaton weekend. It was the best of both the physical and spiritual worlds. This is a 6 minute documentary of our journey, reflections and inspirations… hope you enjoy it!

Filmed by Rabbi Yisroel Bernath on Canon Powershot SD1400 IS
Edited in iMovie for iPhone

weekly-bamidbarNEW

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Weekly Parasha F-U-L-L  Version  24JEWISH.TV WEEKLY PARASHAH,, Select MyRabbi,,, Languages : hebrew,english,russian,french,spanish Great Shiurim and Commentaries Selection

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WEEKLY PARASHAH ARCHIVES

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Parshat Bemidbar: In the Desert – Life During the Journey to Egypt

06.04.2010
http://www.g-dcast.com/bemidbar
Download the Curriculum: http://www.g-dcast.com/bemidbar-lesso…

Just the facts, ma’am. Reporter Helen Chernikoff digs into the statistics of the Israelite census and tells us some interesting stories about the people who were wandering in the desert – much more than just their ages and occupations. Take a look bemidbar – in a desert – and see what you can learn about people.

This is Episode 34 of the weekly Torah cartoon from G-dcast.com. Each week, a different storyteller – some musical, some poetic, some just straight-up, tell the story of the current Torah portion…and then we animate it!





La Paracha avec Boubach saison 2 !!

 

Une nouvelle émission de 613TV qui vous propose 15 minutes de Thora avec une parole de Thora sur la paracha,une loi de Chabbat et une merveilleuse histoire.
Ce pack vous est offert pour embellir votre table de Chabbat.

La paracha #30 : Bamidbar

09.05.2013
Quand un groupe de copains se retrouve dans le désert après un séjour fort désagréable dans un pays étranger, ils font quoi ? Ils commencent à se compter entre eux pardi ! Et ils reçoivent la Torah aussi.

Pour la réfoua chelema de Refael Sharon Ben Alice et Djemila bat Sim’ha.

http://www.roseedemiel.fr/2013/05/09/…

Paracha …..Rosée de Miel

WEEKLY TORAH FOR KIDS

YOUR HOLIDAY GUIDE: Shavuot 5775 – 2015 (May 23-25, 2015)

 

Your Shavuot Guide – 2015
 
Editor’s Note

Shavuot begins this year on Saturday evening, May 23, 2015, and continues through nightfall of May 25, 2015. What follows is a how-to guide to the basics of Shavuot observance.

Out of respect for the sanctity of the holiday, please print out this holiday guidebefore the onset of the holiday and keep it handy throughout the holiday for reference purposes.The Chabad.org staff wishes you and yours a happy Shavuot!

Shavuot 101

What Is Shavuot?

The Torah was given by G‑d to the Jewish people on Mount Sinai more than 3300 years ago. Every year on the holiday of Shavuot we renew our acceptance of G‑d’s gift, and G‑d “re-gives” the Torah.

The word Shavuot means “weeks.” It marks the completion of the seven-week counting period between Passover and Shavuot.

The giving of the Torah was a far-reaching spiritual event—one that touched the essence of the Jewish soul for all times. Our sages have compared it to a wedding between G‑d and the Jewish people. Shavuot also means “oaths,” for on this day G‑d swore eternal devotion to us, and we in turn pledged everlasting loyalty to Him.

In ancient times, two wheat loaves would be offered in Holy Temple. It was also at this time that people would begin to bring bikkurim, their first and choicest fruits, to thank G‑d for Israel’s bounty.

The holiday of Shavuot is a two-day holiday, beginning at sundown of the 5th of Sivan and lasting until nightfall of the 7th of Sivan. (In Israel it is a one-day holiday, ending at nightfall of the 6th of Sivan.)

  • Women and girls light holiday candles to usher in the holiday, on both the first and second evenings of the holidays.
  • It is customary to stay up all night learning Torah on the first night of Shavuot.
  • All men, women and children should go to the synagogue on the first day ofShavuot to hear the reading of the Ten Commandments.
  • As on other holidays, special meals are eaten, and no “work” may be performed.
  • It is customary to eat dairy foods on Shavuot. Among other reasons, this commemorates the fact that upon receiving the Torah, including the kosher laws, the Jewish people could not cook meat in their pots, which had yet to be rendered kosher.
  • On the second day of Shavuot, the Yizkor memorial service is recited.
  • Some communities read the Book of Ruth publicly, as King David—whose passing occurred on this day—was a descendant of Ruth the Moabite.

Click here for more about Shavuot.

What Is the Torah?

The Torah is composed of two parts: the Written Law and the Oral Law. The written Torah contains the Five Books of Moses, the Prophets and the Writings. Together with the Written Torah, Moses was also given the Oral Law, which explains and clarifies the Written Law. It was transmitted orally from generation to generation, and eventually transcribed in the Mishnah, Talmud, Midrash, and the entire corpus of Torah literature that was developed over the millennia.

The word Torah means “instruction” or “guide.” The Torah guides our every step and move through its 613 mitzvahs. The word mitzvah means both “commandment” and “connection.” Through the study of Torah and fulfillment of mitzvahs, we connect ourselves and our environment to G‑d. G‑d’s purpose in creating the world is that we sanctify all of creation, imbuing it with holiness and spirituality.

On the holiday of Shavuot, the entire Jewish nation heard from G‑d the Ten Commandments. The next day Moses went up to Mount Sinai, where he was taught by G‑d the rest of the Torah—both the Written and Oral Laws—which he then transmitted to the entire nation.

Click for related content:

What is the Torah?
The Torah: Law, Truth and Peace

The Role of Children

When the Torah is read in the synagogue on Shavuot, we experience anew the Sinaitic transmission of the Torah by G‑d. Just as the Sinai event was attended by every Jewish man, woman and child, so too, every Jewish person should make every effort to be present in a synagogue on Sunday, May 24, 2015, as the Ten Commandments are read from the Torah.

There is also special significance to bringing children, even the youngest of infants, to hear the Ten Commandments.

Before G‑d gave the Torah to the Jewish people, He demanded guarantors. The Jews made a number of suggestions, all rejected by G‑d, until they declared, “Our children will be our guarantors that we will cherish and observe the Torah.” G‑d immediately accepted them and agreed to give the Torah.

Let us make sure to bring along all our “guarantors” to the synagogue on the first day ofShavuot.

Click here for the Shavuot Kids Zone.

Holiday Traditions

Learning on Shavuot night

On the first night of Shavuot (this year, Saturday night, May 23, 2015), Jews throughout the world observe the centuries-old custom of conducting an all-night vigil dedicated to Torah learning and preparation for receiving the Torah anew the next morning. One explanation for this tradition is that the Jewish people did not rise early on the day G‑d gave the Torah, and it was necessary for G‑d Himself to awaken them. To compensate for their behavior, Jews have accepted upon themselves the custom of remaining awake all night.

The Book of Ruth

The Book of Ruth is recited as part of the program of study for Shavuot night. Additionally, in many synagogues it is read publicly on the second day of Shavuot. There are several reasons for this custom:

  1. Shavuot is the birthday and yahrtzeit (anniversary of passing) of King David, and the Book of Ruth records his ancestry. Ruth and her husband Boaz were King David’s great-grandparents.
  2. The scenes of harvesting described in the book of Ruth are appropriate to the Festival of Harvest.
  3. Ruth was a sincere convert who embraced Judaism with all her heart. OnShavuot all Jews were converts—having accepted the Torah and all of its precepts.

Click here for the Book of Ruth

Click here for the story of Ruth

Click here for the story of King David

Eating Dairy Foods

It is customary to eat dairy foods on the first day of Shavuot. There are a number of reasons for this custom. Here are a few:

  • On the holiday of Shavuot, a two-loaf bread offering was brought in the Temple. To commemorate this, we eat two meals on Shavuot—first a dairy meal, and then, after a short break, we eat the traditional holiday meat meal.
  • With the giving of the Torah, the Jews became obligated to observe the kosher laws. As the Torah was given on Shabbat, no cattle could be slaughtered nor could utensils be koshered, and thus on that day they ate dairy.
  • The Torah is likened to nourishing milk. Also, the Hebrew word for milk ischalav, and when the numerical values of each of the letters in the wordchalav are added together—8 + 30 + 2—the total is forty. Forty is the number of days Moses spent on Mount Sinai when receiving the Torah.
  • When Moses ascended Mount Sinai, the angels urged G‑d to reconsider His decision to give His most precious Torah to earthly beings. “Bestow Your majesty upon the heavens . . . What is man that You should remember him, and the son of man that You should be mindful of him?” (Psalms 8:2–4). One of the reasons why the angels’ request went unheeded is because of the Jews’ meticulous adherence to the laws of the Torah—including the kosher laws. Not so the angels, who when visiting Abraham consumed butter and milk together with meat (Genesis 18:8). On Shavuot we therefore eat dairy products and then take a break before eating meat—in order to demonstrate our commitment to this mitzvah.

Click here for traditional Shavuot dairy recipes

Adorning the Home with Greenery and Flowers

Since Shavuot is also called the “Harvest Festival,” it is customary to adorn the home and synagogue with fruits, flowers and greens. Furthermore, our Sages relate that although Mount Sinai was situated in a desert, when the Torah was given the mountain bloomed and sprouted flowers.

 

Shavuot Calendar 2015

During the course of the holiday we don’t go to work, drive, write, or switch on or off electric devices. We are permitted to cook, to kindle a stove with a flame that existed before the holiday (or which was lit from such a flame), and to carry outdoors.

Shabbat,
Sivan 5—May 23
Shavuot eve

It is customary to decorate synagogues and homes withflowers and boughs .

The holiday of Shavuot begins tonight.

Women and girls light candles tonight to usher in the holiday. Click here for candle-lighting times in your city, and see below for the blessings one recites while lighting.

After the holiday evening prayers, a festive holiday meal, complete with the recitation of the holiday kiddush, is enjoyed.

On this night it is customary to remain awake and study Torah until dawn.

g
Sunday,
Sivan 6—May 24
First day of Shavuot
Torah reading: Exodus 19:1–20:23; Numbers 28:26–31
Haftorah: Ezekiel 1:1–28; 3:12

Reading of the Ten Commandments.

All men, women and children should go to the synagogue to hear the reading of the Ten Commandments. Click hereto find a synagogue near you.

The Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, of righteous memory, encouraged the bringing of even theyoungest of children to the reading of the Ten Commandments in the synagogue on Shavuot. This is in commemoration of the Jewish people declaring: “Our children are our guarantors [that we will keep the Torah].” This, the Midrash states, was the only guarantee acceptable to G‑d.

The priests bless the congregation with the Priestly Blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Many communities chant the Akdamut poem before the reading of the Torah.

Kiddush is recited, and a holiday meal follows.

It is customary to eat dairy foods today. Click here for delicious dairy recipes.

Candle-lighting, from a pre-existing flame, after nightfall.Click here for candle-lighting times in your city, and see below for the blessings.

Whoever will say yizkor tomorrow lights a yahrtzeit candle tonight, also from a pre-existing flame.

After the holiday evening prayers, a festive holiday meal, complete with the recitation of the holiday kiddush, is again enjoyed.

g
Monday
Sivan 7—May 25
Second day of Shavuot
Torah reading: Deuteronomy 15:19–16:17; Numbers 28:26–31
Haftarah: Habakkuk 2:20–3:19

The Yizkor memorial service is recited (and charity is pledged) for the souls of departed loved ones.

The priests bless the congregation with the Priestly Blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Kiddush is recited, and a holiday meal follows.

Some communities have the custom to read the Book of Ruth on the second day of Shavuot.

The holiday ends tonight at nightfall. Click here for end of holiday times in your location.

Candle-Lighting Blessings

For both evenings of the holiday:

  1. Ba-rooch Ah-tah Ah-doh-nai Eh-lo-hei-nu Meh-lech ha-oh-lam ah-sher kee-deh-sha-nu beh-mitz-voh-tav veh-tzee-va-nu leh-had-lik neir shel yom tov.

    (Translation:) Blessed are You, L‑rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and commanded us to kindle the holiday light.

  2. Ba-rooch Ah-tah Ah-doh-nai Eh-lo-hei-nu Meh-lech ha-oh-lam sheh-heh-cheh-yah-nu veh-kee-yeh-mah-nu ve-hee-gee-ah-nu liz-man ha-zeh.

    (Translation:) Blessed are You, L‑rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who has granted us life, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this occasion.

Useful Shavuot Links:

Shavuot Mega-Site

Global Shavuot Event Finder

The Story of Shavuot

Shavuot Personalities

Holiday Insights

Underage Underwriters—60-Second Inspirational Video Clip

Shavuot Kids’ Zone

Traditional Shavuot Recipes

Shavuot Audio Classes, Videos and Songs

Don’t miss out!

Sivan 3, 5775 · May 21, 2015
Hey kids!
This Sunday, May 24th, the Ten Commandments will be read in synagogues all over the world!

Will you be there?

You are the star of the show! When G-d gave the Torah, He relied on the Jewish boys and girls to make sure the Jewish people would love the Torah, learn it, and do its holy mitzvahs. So we’re counting on you to be there now, too!

On Shavuot, it is customary to eat dairy foods. For this reason, many synagogues have an ice cream party for the kids after the Ten Commandments are read.

Parents, click here to find your local family-friendly synagogue.

Happy Shavuot!

Your friends at JewishKids.org

 

This Week’s Features

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Shavuot videos, crafts, recipes, stories and songs!

 

Iyar 28, 5775 · May 17, 2015
Hey kids!

 

Shavuot is just one week away—the holiday when we celebrate the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai.

Mount Sinai was small, plain and dusty. After all, it was in the desert! But in the weeks leading up to the giving of the Torah, G-d made a miracle and the mountain began to sprout and grow fresh, colorful flowers in honor of the big event.

To remember that, we decorate our homes with flowers and greenery for the holiday. Try some of our fun flower crafts and recipes this week, as you prepare for Shavuot.

Most importantly, every year we celebrate this special day, by going to the synagogue and hearing the Ten Commandments being read. On Wednesday, May 24, 2015, make sure to go to your local synagogue and hear the Ten Commandments.

Have a great week!

Your friends at JewishKids.org

 

This Week’s Features

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